What Is The Guns And Dope Party?

This isn’t the most easily answered question. The party’s founder Robert Anton Wilson was a novelist, editor, and futurist among many other things. Certainly more than anything else, he was a man of eclectic tastes and beliefs and was perhaps ahead of the rest of us, philosophically speaking. He was born in 1932 and died in 2007, and his dark sense of humor persisted to the bitter end. He laughed through it all, even in spite of everything he disagreed with in life.

The Guns and Dope Party that he founded promotes several beliefs and causes on its website, many of which are reminiscent of the founders’ beliefs and others which are simply just absurd. They believe that all people have the right to arms, but that no arms should be forced upon other people (this is akin to the libertarian belief that if you want guns, you should have guns–but if you don’t want guns then don’t buy them).

The Guns and Dope Party also believes that you should be freely allowed to enjoy any type of drug so long as you don’t force that drug unto others. In addition, they believe in constitutional democracy (as much as they believe that our current system of government is far, far from that), and fighting for the rights of ostriches. Yes. Ostriches.

Venturing to the Guns and Dope Party website unveils several other positions taken by the interesting political interest group. Get rid of at least one-third of Congress. Leave other people alone. More than anything else, the group wants to get rid of tsars in the White House. They rightly believe that the U.S. drug tsar functions under the assumption that one person can know more about what drugs we should and shouldn’t have than the doctors who study them. After all, the tsar has never met you or studied your health.

The Guns and Dope Party is perhaps best known for its annual celebration in Black Rock City (not really a city) in the corresponding desert of Nevada. You know the one: Burning Man. The event first transpired in 1986 and has since grown exponentially into a non-profit organization with tens of thousands of participants. The popular festival is known for its view of self-expression through art and creativity while fostering a sense of community among its temporary members.

Wilson and his Guns and Dope Party are strong opponents of the fruitless war on drugs, believing that the money invested should be redistributed for other more worthwhile causes. The Guns and Dope Party still remains a relevant and thought-provoking, if comical, organization today.